Smart Thermostat

Z-Wave Can Turn Any Home Into a Smart Home

Smart thermostats are just one of the many elements of a smart home—one in which lighting, heating, and electronics are controlled remotely from one central “hub.” A home automation device, the smart thermostat allows its users to control a home’s heating, program temperatures according to a schedule, and adjust settings. Best of all, these functions may be performed remotely, because smart thermostats connect wirelessly.

In an automated home, the smart thermostat has three functions: to pare down power usage, to keep the residents comfortable, and to learn and predict resident preferences and routines. From there, the choices are seemingly endless—the most sophisticated smart thermostats begin “learning” their users’ behavior as soon as they’re installed and powered on to adjust to your everyday schedule.

Investing in a smart home—and a smart thermostat—makes sense for a number of reasons. First of all, smart thermostats ensure energy savings, because they make it easier, simpler, and more intuitive to turn off heat in an empty house, for example—even from afar. According to a 2004 EPA study, homes with simple thermostats boost better energy savings than those with programmable thermostats, probably due to consumer confusion about how to program and reset.

Enter the smart thermostat: streamlined, simple, intuitive, and connected. Companies like RCS, Honeywell, Linear, and Trane are producing lightweight, easily-programmable thermostats that connect seamlessly to your smart home network. And Z-Wave home automation technology systems, for example, are compatible with most smart thermostats, making setup and everyday use a breeze.

Once you begin to explore the world of smart thermostats, you’ll be amazed at how far technology has come. The Allure Eversense, for example, combines heating technology with speakers and screens, turning off the heat or AC when a user leaves the room, then restarting it when the room is occupied again. And the Honeywell Lyric monitors temperature while also taking into account humidity, understanding intrinsically that a muggy 72 degrees is not the same as a “dry” 72.

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